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The Danger of Lead-Based Paint

October 14, 2015 1:16 am

Though the federal government banned residential use of lead-based paint in 1978, it remains on the walls of about 40 percent of the housing stock today. For children, older homes are considered to be the most hazardous source of lead, and exposure can result in lead poisoning, a serious health concern.

"Awareness is the key to eradicating lead poisoning," says Angie Hicks, founder of Angie’s List. "The more homeowners know, the more likely they are to demand and be willing to pay what it takes to remodel and repair without endangering their children."

Any project that disturbs old paint – such as prep work for re-painting, remodeling or window installation – can create dust and debris that a child may inhale or ingest. Since 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has required contractors whose work disturbs lead paint to be trained and certified in proper safety techniques.

"Of course do-it-yourself projects present the same dangers, so handy homeowners should be following best practices, too," Hicks adds. "This isn't rocket science. It's smart, common sense actions that anyone can do – and all of us who deal with older homes should want to do."

To learn more about residential lead, visit EPA.gov.

Source: Angie’s List

Published with permission from RISMedia.