Gunning Daily News

Natural Disaster Pest Control

November 2, 2012 5:36 pm

Residents cleaning up in the Northeast after Hurricane Sandy need to keep in mind this is the time of year when rodents seek shelter for the winter months. Orkin, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Rollins Inc., warns that rodents can be displaced from their normal habitat because of wind, heavy rain and flooding after severe weather strikes.

"The storm, coupled with the cooler weather, can drive rodents inside to overwinter and breed," says Dave Bridge, Atlantic division technical services director at Orkin. "Their gestation period is about a month, so before you know it, one mouse that finds its way into a home now can turn into a major problem for homeowners in the winter."

A pregnant female mouse can produce an average of eight pups in a litter, and a rat, seven pups on average, with a typical four to five litters per year. However, they aren't just a nuisance—rodents can also pose health threats.

"With the recent increase in the number of vector-borne diseases caused by Hantavirus and Bubonic plague, it is extremely important to be proactive in protecting your home against rodents," says Bridge. "Both diseases tend to occur more frequently in rural parts of the West, which is where rodent activity is higher this year, but those diseases cannot be ruled out here in the East."

Hantavirus is carried in a rodent's urine and feces, and people can breathe in the affected particles in the air. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the plague is most often transmitted by fleas when an infected rodent dies from the plague and the fleas from that transmit bacteria once biting people or pets.

As you clean up from Hurricane Sandy, Orkin recommends the five following tips to help prevent rodents from making their home inside your house:

  1. Make sure all holes, gaps and cracks around doors and windows larger than ¼ of an inch are sealed, as mice can fit through an opening the size of a dime.
  2. Replace door sweeps, and make sure doors and windows close tightly.
  3. Clean out gutters, and install gutter guards to prevent leaves and debris from accumulating.
  4. Store firewood as far from the home as possible.
  5. Trim branches, plants and bushes that hang over the home.

Source: http://orkin.com.

How-To: Stay Safe in Sandy's Aftermath

November 1, 2012 6:34 pm

Regional Spotlight—Hurricane Sandy has moved out of Pennsylvania, but some residents will be dealing with its effects for days, weeks or even longer. The Pennsylvania Department of Health is providing tips to help keep everyone safe and healthy while recovering from this historic storm.

"It has been very difficult for all of us to experience or witness the devastation that Hurricane Sandy brought to parts of Pennsylvania and surrounding areas," says Acting Secretary Michael Wolf. "While preparing for Sandy was vital, it's equally important to take steps now to keep yourself and your loved ones healthy after the storm."

Wolf added that Pennsylvania has a wealth of resources available to help everyone in need, but that there are also many common sense approaches Pennsylvanians can take to help ensure their continued safety. He provided the following information and tips:

Prevent carbon monoxide poisoning:

If your power is out, you may try to power your home by using generators or camp stoves, which can release carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas that is released from many types of equipment, builds up in closed spaces, and is poisonous to breathe. Leave your home immediately and call 9-1-1 if your carbon monoxide detector sounds. Get medical help right away if you are dizzy, light headed or nauseous.

Keep as warm as possible when your power is out:

Hypothermia is a serious condition that happens when your body temperature is too low. This usually happens in very cold weather, but can also happen when exposed to temperatures of 40 degrees or higher. Those most at risk include older Pennsylvanians and babies sleeping in cold rooms. If your power is out for a long time, stay with a relative or friend, or go to an emergency shelter.

Prevent electrical injuries:


Hurricane Sandy left dangerous power lines on the ground when it moved through Pennsylvania. Never touch a fallen power line or drive through standing water if power lines are in the water. Electrical wires on the ground may be "live" and could hurt or kill you. Avoid contact with overhead power lines while cleaning up after the storm and call the power company to report any fallen power lines.

Make sure food and water are safe:


Food - When in doubt, throw it out! If electricity in your home has been off for long periods of time, throw away foods that can spoil (like meat, poultry, fish, eggs, leftovers, etc.)

Water - If your tap water is unsafe to drink, local authorities may issue "boil water advisories". Follow boil water advisories exactly to make sure tap water is safe before you drink or use it. If you cannot boil the water, use bottled water instead.

Prevent unhealthy mold growth after flooding:

Clean up and dry out flooded buildings within 24 to 48 hours if possible. To prevent mold growth, clean wet items and surfaces with detergent and water. Everything that floodwater has touched should be disinfected with a solution of one cup of bleach in one gallon of water.

Sources: www.health.state.pa.us ,www.pa.gov

7 Things You Should Try to Get for Free

October 29, 2012 1:50 pm

There are two ways to get richer, financial analysts tell us: earn more money or spend less. The first part isn’t always possible, but spending less is relatively easy – especially when it’s possible to get for free some of the goods and services we have become accustomed to paying for.

Money Talk consumer advocate Stacy Johnson offers seven good ideas for doing just that:

Free rides – If you have a good driving record, and can travel on a fairly flexible schedule, websites like autodriveaway.com can use your help moving cars from one state to another. There’s no pay, but you won’t pay for transportation to get you where you want to go.

Free lodging – Why pay for a hotel when websites like CouchSurfing.org can help you find a free bed with sponsoring families worldwide? Adventurous seniors can exchange home stays or hosting gigs with peers all over the world via sites such as seniorhomeexchange.com.

Free food for kids -
MyKidsEatFree.com offers a roadmap of where you can save on kids’ meals – just type in a state and city. You’ll pay but your kids will not at more than 5,000 restaurants across the country.

Free audio books –
You can download free audio books from the nonprofit LibriVox.org, which has volunteers recording classics in the public domain – including many classics. You can also volunteer to help by reading. LibriVox will provide you with free recording software.

Free samples - Go to Volition.com, TheFreeSite.com and freechannel.net. for free samples of soap, shampoo, and a hundred other products. You might even find things like free circus tickets or free advance movie screenings.

Free checking – If you are still paying a monthly fee to your bank for checking privileges, it may be time to look for a credit union, or a local or online bank that offers free checking. There are plenty of them out there.
Free ATM access – Don’t pay a “convenience fee” for using an ATM that’s not in your bank’s network. Use an app like ATM Hunter to find a branch ATM. If you can’t find one near you for a free cash withdrawal, plenty of stores will give you cash back with no fee when you make a purchase.

Smart Use for Fall Pesticides

October 29, 2012 1:50 pm

During the fall, I know that homeowners and green industry professionals alike take steps to prepare landscapes for the winter. Leaves are swept away for composting or disposal, perennials and shrubs are pruned, hedges are trimmed, and pesticides are applied in anticipation of next year’s growing season.

For professional arborists and landscapers, fall and early winter are an effective time to use pesticides, a broad term that includes products that kill insect pests and also kill weeds.

Just remember to use a light touch, if you even have to use pesticides at all. Many homeowners may be surprised to learn that raking diseased tree leaves can replace fall pesticide applications in some cases.

Tchukki Andersen, staff arborist for the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA.org) says homeowners may be able to solve landscape problems without pesticides by choosing non-chemical alternatives, such as sanitation procedures and selecting shrubs and ornamental trees that are less susceptible to diseases and insects.

For homeowners who do decide to use pesticides, the TCIA offers these suggestions:

  • Identify the pest first. There is no use in applying a pesticide that won’t address your pest problem.
  • Don’t be tempted to use agricultural chemicals. They aren’t designed for use by homeowners. A small miscalculation in the mixing of a small batch could result in drastic overdosing.
  • Buy the least toxic application. Most chemicals available to homeowners use the signal words “caution,” “warning” or “danger” on their labels. Try to avoid those with the “warning” and “danger” labels, as they are more hazardous.
  • Never mix herbicides with other kinds of pesticides, and never use the same equipment to spray herbicides and other pesticides. You could unintentionally kill the plants you are trying to protect.
  • Don’t mix or store pesticides in food containers, and don’t measure pesticides with the measuring cups and spoons you use in the kitchen. Always store pesticides in the original container, with the label intact.
  • The best choice may be to consult a professional who can diagnose pest problems and recommend chemical or non-chemical alternatives, Andersen advises. A beautiful lawn, shrub or tree isn’t worth the trade-off if pesticides are not being used properly.

In our next segment, we’ll take a look at herbicides.

Bathroom Design: It's All in the Details

October 29, 2012 1:50 pm

(BPT) - It's most likely one of the top reasons you've been putting off that bathroom makeover or remodel - you're not sure where to begin. What should the decor be like? Do you want a pedestal sink or a furniture-style vanity? Will you incorporate any water-saving faucets or fixtures? And, with all the decisions to make, will it all look good together and still perform well?

These questions, and many others, should be at the top of your list when you start mapping out your next bathroom project. Luckily, many manufacturers have made it easier in recent years for you to answer those questions in a painless, affordable way.

“We've created several complementing suites of fixtures and faucets,” says Kevin McJoynt from Danze, Inc. “The elements of each collection were literally made for each other, which makes your job easier.”

So what should you look for when you're planning your next bath or powder room project? Here are a few things to consider when choosing the key pieces:

Sink and vanity -
Choices are abundant when it comes to the sink area of a bathroom. For those smaller footprint powder rooms, or where storage isn't as critical, consider a pedestal sink. If a pedestal doesn't match your taste or needs, furniture-style vanities can have a significant impact on a room's decor and add extra storage.

Faucet - This can be one of the most noticeable accessories in the room and one that homeowners and guests interact with the most. Make sure you choose a style and finish that is consistent with the overall decor. A soft brushed nickel or warm oil-rubbed bronze finish can add a distinct detail to the feeling of the room. If environmentally friendly options are important to you, explore WaterSense-certified faucets that can reduce water usage by 30 percent, without affecting performance.

Toilet - This is one of the best places to go “green” in your bathroom. High-efficiency toilets use 1.28 gallons per flush (gpf), saving two or more gallons of water during each use compared to many toilets installed in the 1980s and prior. This saves 20 percent compared to more recent 1.6 gpf designs that are standard today. And, just because it's a very utilitarian element of a bathroom, don't skimp on design for this piece. Shape, height, styling and color greatly impact how the toilet can enhance the room's decor.

Shower system - Years ago homeowners had a handful of choices for showerheads. Today, there are hundreds of styles, functions, finishes and components that can comprise a home's shower system. This is a recently discovered area of the bathroom that can really show off your personality and can help you create a unique retreat.

Tastes range from building a “shower spa” with wall- and ceiling-mounted showerheads, to conservation-minded shower stalls equipped with WaterSense-certified showerheads.

Bath accessories
- Careful selection of bath accessories is key to creating a finished look to your project. Once again, homeowners have a huge choice. Whether it's the ornate styling of an old-world towel ring, or the sleek lines of a contemporary towel bar, make sure to select accessories that match your room's faucet, sink and other elements (all the way down to the robe hook).

Source: www.danze.com.

6 Tips for Taking the Best Family Portraits

October 29, 2012 11:20 am

(BPT) - As the holidays approach, many families are planning annual portraits for personalized cards and gifts to loved ones. But this can be a complex planning ordeal for even the most organized person. In addition to coordinating schedules and what everyone should wear, it's just as important to focus on the best photography tips, tools and techniques to make the most of your family portrait.

“Everyone who has ever taken or posed for a family photo knows it's a rewarding yet challenging endeavor,” says Tim Meyer, owner of Meyer Photography and program chair of the portrait division of photography at Brooks Institute, a leading provider of higher education for film, visual journalism, graphic design and photography. “The good news is that with proper planning and digital photography advances families can get higher-quality photos than ever before, whether you're hiring a professional photographer or doing it yourself.”

While it can still be difficult to capture the entire family with smiles on their faces, Meyer offers six tips for taking the perfect family portrait this holiday:


1. Invest in quality camera equipment. Digital photography has brought the world of photography to the masses, and high-quality digital cameras can be purchased new or used at reasonable prices. For family portraits, make sure the camera has a timer so you can be a part of the picture. You should also consider buying a tripod to steady your camera and make your photo shoot easier.


2. Scope out the best locations and background for the shoot. Think outside the family fireplace to create interesting indoor backdrops for family photos - but avoid mirrors and windows that can create issues by reflecting light. If choosing an outdoor location, make sure it is free from distraction. Like indoor shots, intricate patterns or background commotion can distract from the subject of the photo - in this case, your family.


3. Consider the best time for taking photos with your family. Natural lighting is great for family photos, particularly the golden hour - the first and last hour of sunlight during each day. If this isn't convenient for your family, choose a time when any children involved in the picture are well rested and more apt to patiently pose for photos. If you're shooting indoors, ensure there's adequate lighting, whether natural or from other sources.


4. Take lots of shots, but remember that the best expressions with children are often the first ones. Group photos are challenging, considering the number of people who must smile and look their best at the same time. Chances are you'll have several photos with eye-blinking subjects and wiggly children. To increase your odds of getting the best family portrait, take as many photos as possible and vary the composition to get different angles and arrangements.


5. Plan ahead if including a furry friend in your family portraits. Many people view their pets as members of the family, so it's only fitting that you might want to include your beloved pet in a family portrait. If so, choose a time when the pet is naturally calmer, perhaps after a walk or at nap time. Also, bring treats to hold the pet's attention and reward the pet for a job well done.


6. Leave it to the professionals. If the challenge of taking your own family photographs becomes overwhelming, connect with a professional photographer who can provide additional tips or work within your budget to help you get professional family photos in time for the holidays. Today's professionals offer a greater variety of styles and ways of sharing your images than ever before.

Get Your Furnace Winter Ready

October 29, 2012 11:20 am

While you may not give thought to your home-heating devices until the first frost pulls ill, it’s actually best to inspect them before they are needed, according to Jimmie Cho, vice president of services for SoCalGas.


"Now is the time to perform maintenance on your home-heating appliances to check that they can be operated safely and efficiently," says Jimmie Cho.

Why should you check your furnace now? Failure to perform annual maintenance on gas appliances may result in exposure to carbon monoxide, which can cause nausea, drowsiness, flu-like symptoms, and even death.

Since home heating typically accounts for more than half of the monthly winter gas bill, the best way to keep bills lower is to get gas appliances serviced, Cho says.

Cho offers these tips for a safe, warm, and energy-efficient winter:

  • Have natural gas furnaces checked at least once a year by a licensed heating contractor.
  • Vacuum and clean regularly in and around the furnace, particularly around the burner compartment to prevent a build-up of dust and lint.
  • Never store items in, on or around the appliance that can obstruct airflow.
  • Most forced-air units have a filter that cleans the air before heating and circulating it throughout the home. Check furnace filters every month during the heating season and clean or replace the filter when necessary.
  • When installing a new or cleaned furnace filter, be sure to re-install the front panel door of the furnace properly so it fits snugly; never operate the furnace without the front-panel door properly in place because doing so may create the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • Check the appearance of the flame. If the flame is yellow, large and unsteady, the furnace needs to be inspected immediately by a licensed heating contractor or SoCalGas to have the condition corrected.
  • Using an unvented gas heater in your home is dangerous and a violation of the California Health and Safety Code.
  • Never use your oven, range or outdoor barbecue to heat your home because these appliances are not designed for this purpose.

Source: http://www.socalgas.com

Fire Prevention Focus: Keeping ‘Fire Safe’ Year Round

October 29, 2012 11:20 am

In the next installment of our October focus on fire prevention, I have tapped the National Fire Protection Association for some potentially life-saving fire safety tips.

In a previous segment, the NFPA reported that cooking fires caused an estimated average of 2,590 civilian deaths and $7.2 billion in direct property damage yearly. And based on research by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), cooking was also the number one cause of home structure fires that went unreported.

We also learned that Smoking materials are the leading cause of home fire deaths followed by heating equipment and then cooking equipment. So consider following these words of advice from the NFPA:

  • Smoke outside - Ask smokers to smoke outside. Have sturdy, deep ashtrays for smokers.
  • Keep matches and lighters out of reach - Keep matches and lighters up high, out of the reach of children, preferably in a locked cabinet.
  • Inspect electrical cords - Replace cords that are cracked, damaged, have broken plugs, or have loose connections.
  • Be careful when using candles - Keep candles at least one foot from anything that can burn. Blow out candles when you leave the room or go to sleep.
  • Install smoke alarms - Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, inside bedrooms and outside sleeping areas. Interconnect smoke alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.
  • Test your smoke alarms at least once a month and replace conventional batteries once a year or when the alarm “chirps” to tell you the battery is low.
  • Replace any smoke alarm that is more than 10 years old.
  • Install sprinklers - If you are building or remodeling your home, install residential fire sprinklers. Sprinklers can contain and may even extinguish a fire in less time than it would take the fire department to arrive.

Homeowners can get more detailed information about each of the above prevention tips by visiting the NFPA’s website at www.nfpa.org.

Word of the Day

October 29, 2012 11:20 am

Appurtenance. Whatever is annexed to land or used with it that will pass to the buyer with conveyance of title, such as a garage or fence.

Q: How Can I Finance a Remodeling Project?

October 29, 2012 11:20 am

A: There are many ways to finance a remodeling project. If you have equity in your home, a good credit rating, and steady income, you can refinance your mortgage and borrow a percentage of the equity to cover remodeling costs.

Refinancing is a good option if you can get a mortgage interest rate at least two percentage points below your current home loan rate. Other options include a second mortgage, a home equity loan, or an unsecured loan. Less popular options: margin loans, which are taken against securities you own, and loans from retirement plans, life insurance policies and credit cards.